UniLib Creator (beta)

Universal Library Creator (Unilib) is an small application created in my spare time to facilitate operations done on static and dynamic libraries on iOS and OS X.

It combines some pretty neat stuff I wanted to try for so long using system services. I began writing some code for system services some time ago, and this is a project I made for myself, and thing it will help others.

It has helped me in many occasions, especially with Xcode 4. On iOS, the static libraries produced are for the actual device or the iPhone. It’s never for both. I don’t know why Apple hasn’t included this functionality in XCode 4, since it was already included in Xcode 3. All I know, is that I had found it hard to distribute my static libraries without giving the code, since the user would have to link them against the device or the simulator depending on the test environment, never both.

Some features:

  • Combine static FAT or plain libraries to make FAT static libraries for both OS X and iPhone
  • Obtain info about a static library like the architectures in it, and the object files in it
  • Exctract specific applications from a library.
  • Really UGLY user interface for the time being. Will certainly be improved.

Unilib is currently in bleeding edge beta, with only those basic functions implemented. It will be updated constantly, until it reaches to a point where it will be a commercial application for the Mac Application Store. So far it is free for use.

Requires Lion and an Intel 64-bit platform.

You can download the application here. It also includes some basic auto-update mechanism. Will add more features in future releases.

Making fat static Libraries (Simulator + Device), and applying to Three20

I am starting to get involved with the Three20 project. This project contains valuable classes and UI elements that I need. However, this big library is notorious for its difficulty to include inside an XCode 4 project. The included install script does not work, and the manual install instructions are a miss, and I ended up with Xcode complaining that it can’t find header files, even if I had set up the header search paths correctly.

So, I decided to pre-build the static libraries and include them to my project, and I was successful… to an extent. You see, I couldn’t use the same static libraries for the Simulator and the device, because the libraries built are built each time for the device you specify, and that device only. For example, if you build the libraries for the simulator, the produced libraries will work for the simulator. For the device, you need a different library package.

That led me to the long trip of finding a way to compile a static library for iOS that works for different architectures: armv6, armv7, and i386. Read on to find out how you can manage to make a static library that will work on all platforms.

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